teacher training workshops

Tanner Humanities Center Gateway to Learning Educators Workshop

Center for Latin American Studies' faculty members offer annual training workshops for K-12 teachers in partnership with the Tanner Humanities Center Gateway to Learning Educators Workshop program.

Summer 2016 Teacher Training Workshops

Place, Story, and History in Contemporary World Literature (July 11-15)
Professor Scott Black, Department of English

This course will survey contemporary world literature, with particular emphasis on questions about the relationships between local place and global space. We will read recent fiction from Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East, and ask about the various ways local traditions respond to the pressures of globalization. How have writers used fiction to examine social and historical conflicts, challenge official histories, and recover forgotten voices and neglected traditions? And how have writers used traditional narrative resources to stretch the possibilities of the novel and the short story? In many of these works, local answers to global historical pressures involve reviving traditional aesthetic practices, and we will approach our materials as both social documents and works of art. We will also explore ways of bringing formal and aesthetic questions to bear on discussions of social issues in the classroom.

Readings will include: Alaa Al Aswany’s The Yacoubian Building and Other Voices, Other Vistas: Short Stories from Africa, China, India, Japan, and Latin America, ed. Barbara Solomon


Critical Issues in Urban Education (August 1-5)
Instructor Andrea Garavito Martinez, College of Education

This workshop will provide an introduction to some of the most important problems and debates within Latin American history, society and culture in order to understand the changing demographics of the K-12 Latina/o population in Utah. This multi-disciplinary approach engages an array of materials including films, fiction/non-fiction books, photographs and art to understand migration and immigration patterns. It will guide participants in understanding systems of conquest and colonization in Latin America including active forms of resistance, decolonization, and transformation and how they translate into school structures and education. Topics of investigation and discussion includes: foundation to Multicultural Education Studies, Latin American Studies, Chicana/o Studies in Education, Critical, feminist, and Indigenous studies in education, Family, School, and Community Connections, and Discipline, Policing, and Education.

Summer 2015 Teacher Training Workshops

SUGAR, SOCCER AND SMOKES: RE-THINKING CARIBBEAN, LATIN AMERICAN AND SPANISH IDENTITIES THROUGH CULTURAL PRODUCTION -- July 27-30

Faculty: Dr. Gema Guevara and Dr. Gary Atwood

The goal of this workshop is to study the cultural significance of food, dance and material culture in Latin America, the Caribbean and Spain beyond the idea of the exotic. Professor Guevara will explore how sugar and tobacco transformed not only the labor force in the Caribbean, but the culinary tastes of Europe.

Professor Atwood will explore tactical deployments of bullfighting, soccer, flamenco and zarzuela that seek to create symbols of a unified, purportedly “coherent” Spanish identity and to attract tourism.

We will review poetry, material culture, short films, photography, short story and essay.


Multicultural Education -- July 6-10

Andrea Garavito, Doctoral Student, Education Culture and Society

Utah is a "new immigrant gateway," meaning that it has one of the fastest growing immigrant populations in the country. The vast majority of these immigrants come from Latin America, particularly Mexico. One result of this wave of migration is that Utah's classrooms are more multicultural than ever, presenting both challenges and opportunities for educators. This workshop will provide an introduction to the changing demographic population of K-12 students and provide participants with models and strategies for effectively teaching minority students that create classroom and school atmospheres that are accepting of diversity. Topics of investigation and discussion will include: the causes of migration and of settlement patterns in the United States; schools as key locations for integration and/or marginalization; challenges and opportunities diverse classrooms pose for students and teachers; culturally appropriate curriculum; deficit vs. asset perspectives on students and communities. The University of Utah's Latin American Studies Program is a proud sponsor of this workshop.

Summer 2014 Teacher Training Workshops

IMMIGRATION AND EDUCATION (AUGUST 4 – 8)

Utah is a "new immigrant gateway," meaning that it has one of the fastest growing immigrant populations in the country. The vast majority of these immigrants come from Latin America, particularly Mexico. This workshop will provide an introduction to the immigrant population from Latin America and to related issues that affect local schools. Topics of investigation and discussion will include: the causes of migration and of settlement patterns in the United States; the diversity of Utah's immigrant population; the unintended consequences of immigration policies; schools as key locations for integration and/or marginalization; challenges and opportunities diverse classrooms pose for students and teachers; and integration as a two-way process. The University of Utah's Latin American Studies Program is a proud sponsor of this workshop.

Past Teacher Training Workshops

A RETROSPECTIVE LOOK AT THE MEXICAN AND CUBAN REVOLUATIONS (AUGUST 6 – 10, 2012)

This language immersion workshop will examine the half-century literary and cultural legacies of the Mexican Revolution (1920-1970) and the Cuban Revolution (1959-2009), including their hemispheric impact upon education, civil society, and popular culture.


SPANISH LANGUAGE IMMERSION WORKSHOP (AUGUST 1 – 5, 2011)

This language immersion workshop, taught by expert professors of Latin American literatures, will explore a variety of cultural expressions from indigenous, Afro-Latino, and mestizo perspectives.


UTOPIAS AND DYSTOPIAS IN THE SPANISH-SPEAKING WORLD: TWENTIETH CENTURY THROUGH THE PRESENT (AUGUST 2 – 6, 2010)

A language immersion workshop acquainting teachers with the frameworks of utopia and dystopia to study representations of society in Spanish and Latin American literature and culture.

 

For a complete list of past workshops, please click here.