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Featured Faculty

Chris
Isabel
Shane
Alejandro
Elena

Christopher Lewis

Department: World Languages and Cultures

Current research:

Though I am primarily a Brazilianist, I have research and teaching interests that span the lusophone world. I am interested in concepts of time, identity, and genre convergence / transgression in film, popular music, and literature, and have published on both contemporary and canonical works. I am currently working on projects exploring writing after post-modernism and the literary heritage of the War of Canudos and the Utah War.

Opportunities for students:

I have served on graduate committees for students studying a wide variety of subjects relating to Brazil, but projects whose focus revolves around literature, cinema, music, and cultural studies are the best fit for my expertise.

Isabel Dulfano

Department: World Languages and Cultures

Current research:

My research is divided between literary and cultural studies related to the Indigenous peoples of the Americas, and international business practices and cultural processes that impact sustainable development in primarily rural Latin America.
Regarding the first, from the perspective of intersectionality, I am interested in the unmediated autoethnographic expression articulated by contemporary Indigenous women, regarding their identity formation, gender, professional engagement, and definitions of activism. How are the historical, paradigms of gender relations, socio-economic and political rights of the Indigenous communities deconstructed and decolonized by these women? In what ways do their efforts advance the transformation of misperceptions in the social imaginary and vindicate the cultural, gender and socio-economic identity?

Opportunities for students:

I would enjoy collaborating with students in diverse ways. Currently my graduate students are involved with Art Books and the Latin American canon, border studies, historical and current Indigenous narratives, and Chicana literary studies.

Shane J Macfarlan

Department: Anthropology

Current research:

I am a broadly trained scientific cultural anthropologist with research interests in Latin America and the Caribbean. My research applies methods and theories from cultural anthropology, evolutionary biology, neo-institutional economics, and systems ecology to study cooperation, conflict, and natural resource management in small-scale societies. Over the last 10 years, I have examined how people construct and maintain informal social support networks to buffer against risk (Commonwealth of Dominica), the relationship between warfare and marriage in lowland Amazonia (Venezuela and Ecuador), and indigenous cultural adaptations to desert ecologies (Baja California Sur, Mexico). My current research projects are focused largely on rural populations and desert ecosystems in Baja California Sur, Mexico. Research topics include 1) how traditional ecological knowledge affects spring water management; 2) how social networks impact economic inequality; and 3) the historical demography of the Baja California peninsula during the 18th and 19th centuries.

Opportunities for students:

I am particularly interested in collaborating with students on research projects that focus on the Baja California peninsula; however, I am willing to work with students on a variety of topics, especially those dealing with social networks, natural resource management, desert ecologies, and/or cooperation and conflict.

 


Alejandro Quin

Department: World Languages and Cultures

Current research:

I work on modern and contemporary Latin American literature and culture with an emphasis on Colombia, Paraguay, and the transnational Amazon region. My research and teaching explore the relationship between cultural production and state formation, sovereignty and biopolitics, insurgent movements, intellectual history, and environmental thought. Currently, I am working on a project that traces the connections between literature, land surveying, and the role of extractive economies in early 20th-century Latin America.  

Opportunities for students:

I am willing to work with students interested in 19th and 20th century Latin American literature, cultural history, intellectual traditions, and environmental issues, particularly in the South American context.  

 

Elena Shtromberg

Department: Art History

Current research:

I am an art historian specializing in modern and contemporary Latin American visual culture, with a specific focus on Brazil and the U.S.-Mexico border region. My interdisciplinary research interests extend to gender, race and media studies, cultural studies, as well as communications, geography and globalization. I have also curated a number of exhibitions, the latest among them a landmark survey titled “Video Art in Latin America” (Fall 2017) at LAXART, an alternative art space in Los Angeles.

Opportunities for students:

I am interested in working with students on a variety of topics related to Latin American and/or Latino visual culture, ideally from the modern and contemporary periods (20th and 21st centuries).

 

Last Updated: 5/23/18